history of 6,3,3,4 education system in nigeria

After independence in 1960, Nigeria introduced an educational system known as the 6-3-3-4 system of education: six years of primary school (roughly for 5-11-year-olds) regarded as basic education; three years of junior secondary school (roughly 11-13-yearolds); three years of senior secondary school (roughly 13-16/17 years old.
); and four years of university (16/18 and above). In 2006, a new basic education policy merged the six years of primary education and the three years of junior secondary education as basic education, thereby giving birth to a 9-3-4 system of education (Uwaifo and Uddin 2009). The secondary education culminates in students sitting one or two or all of the three senior second-ary school examinations administered in Nigeria by West African Examinations Council (WAEC), National Examinations Council (NECO) or National Board for Technical Ed-ucation (NABTEB)
After independence in 1960, Nigeria introduced an educational system known as the 6-3-3-4 system of education: six years of primary school (roughly for 5-11-year-olds) regarded as basic education; three years of junior secondary school (roughly 11-13-yearolds); three years of senior secondary school (roughly 13-16/17-year-olds); and four years of university (16/18 and above). In 2006, a new basic education policy merged the six years of primary education and the three years of junior secondary education as basic education, thereby giving birth to a 9-3-4 system of education (Uwaifo and Uddin 2009). The secondary education culminates in students sitting one or two or all of the three senior second-ary school examinations administered in Nigeria by West African Examinations Council (WAEC), National Examinations Council (NECO) or National Board for Technical Ed-ucation (NABTEB)
Twenty five years after the introduction of the 6-3-3-4 system, another reform tagged the Universal Basic Education (UBE) was introduced. The UBE that ensures that every child is kept at the elementary school for nine year, followed by three years of secondary school and four years of higher education (9-3-4), was conceived in furtherance of the attainment of the Millennium Development Goals (Charles & Adebiyi, 2008;Uwaifo & Uddin, 2009).
Do you find this interesting, like and share the content.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.